Tech Giants Move Into eGrocery Sales

Online grocery is no longer just the purview of brick-and-mortar incumbents and emerging eCommerce startups. Major technology companies are also making moves into the space.

Apple, for one, is said to be looking into launching its own grocery delivery ordering service to rival Instacart, although Apple’s service would have more of a focus on nutrition, according to an Apple Insider report Sunday (May 8).

Apple is not the only major technology company looking to establish itself in this growing sector. The market for grocery delivery can be a valuable category for any company looking to embed its offerings deeper into consumers’ daily routines. After all, people need food every day, and many purchase groceries several times a week, ensuring regular engagement. As such, the category is proving to be a battleground for many players.

Google, for its part, has also been integrating its offerings into the grocery shopping experience. For instance, it is integrating grocery purchasing and order-tracking features into its navigation app. Additionally, in March 2021, the company announced a partnership with Albertsons Companies to integrate its cloud technologies into the grocer’s digital platforms.

Amazon, another member of the Big Tech club, has been changing its policies over the past few years in an attempt to capture the growing number of consumers who have apparently ditched physical supermarkets and prefer to make their grocery shopping online through its Whole Foods division.

Amazon’s foray into groceries has already caught the attention of regulators, with the UK competition regulator saying back in February that Amazon is now officially considered a grocery retailer. Amazon has rapidly expanded its UK grocery presence in recent years and has now opened eight physical stores, as well as its growing eGrocery services.

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