US States Seek Spring 2022 Trial Date In Google Case

One attorney representing more than a dozen states spearheaded by Texas that have alleged that Google contravened antitrust law is seeking to have a US judge to put a trial on the books for the spring of next year. By contrast, Google is seeking to have the trial in the autumn of 2023, Reuters reported.

Mark Lanier, who represents Texas, among the other states, said in a pre-trial hearing that they could be ready in an expedient manner. “We’re able to put focused people on this to make this their reason for living,” Lanier informed the judge, as per Reuters.

But Paul Yetter, who was speaking for Google, said it had obtained 1.1 terabytes of over a million documents from the states and that it needed time to be prepared. “I think we all would agree that if you have a big head start you want a short race. And they do have a big head start,” he said, according to Reuters.

In a pre-trial hearing on Thursday, May 6, Mark Lanier, arguing for Texas and the other states, said the burden was on them to prove the case against Google and that they could be ready quickly. “We’re able to put focused people on this to make this their reason for living,” Lanier told the judge.

The Texas lawsuit accuses Google of violating the law in how it dominates the process of placing ads online. Website publishers complain that one result has been lower revenues.

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