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Kai-Uwe Kuhn

Professor Kühn is a Professor of Economics at the University of East Anglia who has advised on all aspects of competition matters for 25 years. He has served as the Chief Economist of DG Competition, European Commission.

Professor Kühn is a Professor of Economics and Deputy Director of the Centre for Competition Policy at the University of East Anglia. He holds visiting appointments at the Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE) and Georgetown University. From May 2011 to August 2013, Professor Kühn was Chief Economist at DG Competition, European Commission. He has advised competition authorities and private firms on competition policy as well as merger, state aid, and antitrust cases for 25 years.

His consultancy work has covered the whole range of competition matters from policy issues (e.g. the Commission Notice on Market Definition (1997), the 1997 Green paper on Vertical Restraints, the 2010 Vertical Guidelines) to mergers (e.g. GE/Honeywell merger (2001) including the court appeal), and antitrust matters (e.g. the Microsoft I on server interoperability). Most recently he acted as an expert in a large number of cartel damages cases, advised on complex antitrust cases (e.g. hotel bookings and another MFN case, radius clauses, and novel forms of exploitative abuses such as privacy and other contractual terms), as well as large number of merger cases in different jurisdictions. During his time as Chief Economist, he advised the Competition Commissioner on all competition cases and policy initiatives (in particular State Aid Modernization) and led the economic analysis on many large mergers (e.g. Deutsche Börse/NYSE, UPS/TNT, Univeral/EMI, H3G/Orange Austria, Western Digital/Hitachi, Outokumpu/Inoxum) and antitrust cases (e.g. Google, e-books, and the Standard Essential Patent cases), often in close cooperation with counterparts at the US agencies.

CPI Content by Kai-Uwe Kuhn

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