Huawei v ZTE – No More Need to Look at the Orange Book in SEP Disputes

This article is part of a Chronicle. See more from this Chronicle James Killick, Stratigoula Sakellariou, Oct 27, 2015 Industry standards are crucial for economic development—they reduce transaction and production costs; they increase efficiency; they ensure network interoperability. A number of industries, such as telecoms, IT, and automotive heavily rely on standards. Once a standard […]

OCT-15(2)

OCT-15(2)

In this issue: In our previous issue we took a broad look at the intersection of antitrust and intellectual property. Now we’re burrowing more deeply, looking at the ECJ’s decision in Huawei v ZTE that attempts to establish an EU framework for SEP licensing negotiations—a decision made even more noteworthy as the two players are both Chinese tech giants. Our authors […]

What’s New at the IP and Antitrust Crossroad

What’s New at the IP and Antitrust Crossroad

In this issue: The intersection of antitrust and intellectual property continues to be tricky to navigate. Several competition authorities (Canada, Japan, Korea) have issued new approaches while other countries (India) have begun to look at case law. This week we’re going to look at some of these trends; in our next issue we’re going to burrow […]

Hong Kong’s New Competition Regime

Hong Kong’s New Competition Regime

In this issue: After years of political debate, the Hong Kong Competition Ordinance will finally come into force on December 14, 2015. The new law merits attention not only because of Hong Kong’s economic position and possible influence on—or by—China, but because the debate highlighted many of the challenges Asian markets face in introducing competition […]

Criminalization of Cartels and Leniency: An Exercise in Complexity

Criminalization of Cartels and Leniency: An Exercise in Complexity

This article is part of a Chronicle. See more from this Chronicle Marcelo Calliari, Sep 16, 2015 What change a decade brings. Ten years ago the calls for a spread of leniency policies were undisputed. Their success in detecting cartels in a few jurisdictions, notably the United States and the European Union, seemed to justify the […]

Leniency Programs in Cartel Enforcement

Leniency Programs in Cartel Enforcement

In this issue: If there’s one topic that never gets stale in antitrust, it’s cartels. With the help of guest editor Rein Wesseling, we’re taking a look at the current state of cartel enforcement, in particular leniency programs. Is their early success threatened by new roadblocks, including conflicts with enforcing individual criminal charges, different global […]

Antitrust Antipasto

Antitrust Antipasto

In this issue: We’re serving up our summer beach reading equivalent—an antitrust antipasto feast of eight disparate articles. Some bring us up to date on topics we dove into earlier, some respond to previous articles, some highlight topical subjects, and some visit intriguing parts of the world to see what’s new. There’s something here for […]

EU Competition Enforcement and Compliance with Fundamental Rights’ Standards: The Challenge and the Promise of Accession to the ECHR

EU Competition Enforcement and Compliance with Fundamental Rights’ Standards: The Challenge and the Promise of Accession to the ECHR

This article is part of a Chronicle. See more from this Chronicle Arianna Andreangeli, Jul 15, 2015 The question of the compliance of the framework and the procedures for the enforcement of the EU competition rules with human rights’ rules has been a vexed subject for many years. In that context, whether and how the […]

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