JUL-13(2)

This issue we asked some noted economists to opine on hot antitrust topics, presenting viewpoints that considered both theory and practice. The results were both thought-provoking and diversified. Two articles on the recent Apple eBook case consider how the ruling changes MFN agreements. Then we analyze what the backlash against experimental economics realistically means for antitrust practice, explore why recent court rulings have made the difference between framing a vertical practice as predation or exclusive dealing so important, and end up looking at how to correct anticompetitive market distortions. Hope everyone is having a wonderful summer!

MFNs, Unnatural Experiments, Vertical Practices, & Anticompetitive Distortions

John Bigelow, Jason Wu, Jul 29, 2013

Competition and the Most Favored Nation Clause

There is no simple antitrust consensus for or against MFNs. Jason J. Wu & John P. Bigelow (Compass Lexecon)

Joshua Gans, Jul 29, 2013

Most Favored Nation Clauses Moving Out of Favor

To keep customers from siphoning off a platform, the best advice is to provide them with a competitive quality product than to use a particular contractual term. Joshua Gans (Univ. of Toronto)

Gregory Leonard, Jul 29, 2013

Not So Natural Experiments

Antitrust analysis based on natural experiments should pay heed to the warnings that have come out of this re-evaluation. Gregory K. Leonard (Edgeworth Economics LLC)

John Asker, Shannon Seitz, Jul 29, 2013

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